The Different Types of Mortgages Explained

When you start out looking for a mortgage you will soon realise that there are lots of different options available. Below you will see a list of the most popular types of mortgages available on the market and hopefully, my short videos will give you a better understanding of what each option offers. If you have any questions regarding any of the below mortgage options, then please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

What is a Fixed Rate Mortgage?

What is a Fixed Rate Mortgage? – A fixed rate mortgage means that your mortgage payments are going to stay the same for a set period of time. You can set the length of which you want to fix your payments for, typically this being 2, 3 or 5 years or longer. And no matter what happens to inflation, interest rates or the economy you know that your mortgage payment, usually your biggest outgoing, will not change.

 

What is a Tracker Mortgage?

What is a Tracker Mortgage? – A tracker mortgage means that your interest rate will track the Bank of England’s base rate. So in other words, the lender that you are with does not actually set the rate themselves, you will be paying a percentage above the Bank of England base rate. In an example if the base rate is 1% and you are tracking at 1% above base rate, that means you will be paying a rate of 2%. Back in the mid 2000’s these deals were very popular, as the rate you where tracking was a fraction above that of the base rate. These deals aren’t as attractive anymore, however always remember that it is a variable rate so if the Bank of England base rate goes up, your mortgage payments will also increase.

 

What is a Repayment Mortgage?

What is a Repayment Mortgage? – When you take out a repayment mortgage this means that each month you are paying capital and interest combined. So as long as you keep your payments going for the full length of the mortgage term, the mortgage balance is guaranteed to be paid off at the end and the property becomes yours. This is the most risk free way to pay your capital back to the lender, in the early years it is mainly the interest that you are paying and your balance will reduce very slowly especially if you have taken out a 25, 30 or 35 year term. This situation switches in the last ten years or so of your mortgage where your payments are paying off more capital than interest and the balance will come down much faster.

 

What is an Interest Only Mortgage?

What is an Interest Only Mortgage? – Whilst many buy to let mortgages are set up on an interest only basis, it is much more difficult to get a residential property on an interest only basis. Back in the 80’s and 90’s how a mortgage would work is that you would take out an interest only mortgage, a mortgage were you just pay the interest. And the idea was that you would take out a separate investment vehicle, such as an endowment policy or pension to pay the balance back at the end of the mortgage term. Whether there is going to be enough money to pay the capital balance will depend on the performance of your investment vehicle. During the 2000’s some of these investments didn’t perform as well as expected and some borrowers were left with a shortfall. It is much less likely for lenders to offer an interest only product now, however there are certain circumstances where this can be an option if you are going to downsize when you are older, or have other investments what you will use to pay the capital back. Lenders are very strict when it comes to offering these products now and the loan to values are a lot lower then back in the day.

 

What is an Offset Mortgage?

What is an Offset Mortgage? – With an offset mortgage the lender will set you up a savings account to go alongside your mortgage account. How this works is that let’s say you have a mortgage balance of £100,000 and £20,000 is deposited into your savings account, you only pay interest on the difference, so in this case £80,000. This can be a very efficient way of managing your money, especially if you are a higher rate tax payer. This also is a way of reducing the mortgage term because as that money is sitting in that savings account your mortgage term shrinks. This mortgage option was popular in the late 90’s and early 2000’s, it originated in Australia and became popular in the UK when introduced by lenders such as The Yorkshire Bank. Currently this is not a very popular mortgage option, I guess the reason for this is that people don’t save as much as they used to anymore, however in the right circumstances an offset can be the perfect solution.

Malcolm Davidson – Mortgage Advice in Lincoln. 

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